Getting diagnosed with diabetes affects income

​New research from Steno Diabetes Center shows that persons who are diagnosed with diabetes have a lower income compared to people without diabetes five years after their diagnosis. 

This week, Steno Diabetes Center is presenting new study results at the international diabetes congress IDF (International Diabetes Federation) in Vancouver, Canada. The findings show that people with diabetes on average have a lower income compared to people without diabetes five years after their diagnosis and that the difference is most significant among people who are diagnosed at a young age. 

“What we know from earlier studies is that people who have had diabetes for a number of years, and perhaps also have complications, have increased risk of loss of productivity resulting in lower income compared to the general population. Now it turns out that the lower level of income can be identified already a few years after getting diagnosed and that the difference is bigger among the younger population”, says senior researcher at Steno Diabetes Center, Bryan Cleal.
 

Age levels out the differences

The findings show that the difference in income are most significant among people who are diagnosed when they are between 25 and 45 years while this is levelled out among the older groups who are between 46 and 61 years of age and who typically have a higher income at the time of diagnosis.

”Managing diabetes is not easy and for some people it might lead to reduced working hours, early retirement and if it involves for example kidney or cardiovascular complications that might also affect people’s work life”, says Bryan Cleal. 

The study was conducted via the Danish Diabetes Registry among 171.000 Danes with type 1 and type 2 diabetes who were followed five years after being diagnosed with diabetes. This group was compared to persons who were matching on parameters such as gender, age, residence, annual income etc. and who were identified among 2,8 million Danes. 

Findings show that:

  • People with diabetes who are diagnosed when they are between 25 and 45 years have an income that is 3,882 USD lower a year than people without diabetes
  • Among people who were diagnosed when they were between 46 and 55 years the difference is 2,847 USD
  • In the group diagnosed at age 56 to 61 years the difference is 1,760 USD compared to the general population.  

Responsible editor